Services at Banner Boswell Medical Center  

Diagnosis

Neurosciences  

Banner Boswell’s Neurosciences Program uses such diagnostic screening technologies and procedures as:

Ambulatory Electroencephalography (AAEG) – allows monitoring of a patient for 24 hours or longer without hospitalization to: confirm clinical diagnosis of epilepsy; document seizures that the patient is unaware of; evaluate response to therapy; or evaluate dizziness.


Brain perfusion – During brain perfusion imaging, qualified patients are given an intravenous injection of contrast and undergo detailed CT scan of their brain. Using specialized software, doctors can see which areas of the brain have been damaged by stroke. The study also reveals information about blood flow, volume and transit time, all key factors in determining the best course of treatment following stroke, which may include tPA or other interventions to break down or remove a blood clot.


Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response (BAER) – evaluates the auditory nerve pathways from the ears through the brainstem. Indicated for: suspected Multiple Sclerosis; acoustic neuromas; posterior foss tumors; childhood screening for hearing disorders; or evaluation of brainstem maturity in premature infants.


Computed Tomography (CT) – an imaging test in which a part of the body is X-rayed from different angles and images are combined by a computer to produce cross-sectional pictures of internal organs.


Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) – CTA of the brain is used to visualize blood vessels within the head.  CTA is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), occlusion or aneurysms (vessel wall dilations at risk of rupture). CTA is often used to evaluate the arteries of the neck and brain, the thoracic and abdominal aorta and the renal arteries.


DaTscan a nuclear medicine imaging study that analyzes dopamine activity in the brain. Dopamine affects the nerve terminals that control movement. The outpatient scan gives doctors visual evidence of abnormal functioning in the area of the brain that controls movement and other muscle functions. This helps physicians confirm a positive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and rule out other conditions that mimic it, such as essential tremor. While the symptoms are similar, treatment and management greatly differ.


Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Angiogram (MRA) – a group of techniques based on MRI to image blood vessels. MRA is used to generate images of the arteries in order to evaluate them for stenosis (abnormal narrowing), occlusion or aneurysms (vessel wall dilations at risk of rupture). MRA is often used to evaluate the arteries of the neck and brain, the thoracic and abdominal aorta, the renal arteries and the legs.


Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – an advanced method of generating clear images of the body without the use of X-rays. MRI uses a powerful, harmless magnetic field and radio waves to produce detailed images of body structure, such as the brain, spine, extremities and other organs.


 Diagnostic Neurology


Electroencephalography (EEG) – sometimes called a brain wave test, used for testing patients with epilepsy, a brain tumor, a brain abscess, brain trauma, subdural hematoma, meningitis, encephalitis, stroke or congenital defects of the brain.


Electromyography (EMG) – used to evaluate and record the activation signal of muscles.


Electronystagmography (ENG) – is used to evaluate vertigo, dizziness and equilibrium problems dues to central and vestibular disorders.


Somasensory Evoked Potentials (SSEP) – assesses the pathways from the nerves in the arms or legs, through the spinal cord, to the brainstem and ultimately to the cerebral cortex. Indicated for use in Multiple Sclerosis, transverse myelitis, spinal cord injury, tethered cord, brain injury and stroke.


Video Electroencephalography (VEEG) – utilizes audio and video recordings to confirm clinical diagnosis of epilepsy; document seizures that the patient is unaware of; evaluate response to therapy; or evaluate dizziness.


Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP) – used extensively for assessing visual nerve pathways, and is especially useful in showing demyelinating changes in the optic nerve. Mainly used in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and suspected optic neuritis.


For More Information
podcasts Podcasts: Neurology Procedures
video Videos: Neurological Conditions
risk assessment Test your knowledge about stroke

Banner Boswell Medical Center
10401 W. Thunderbird Blvd.
Sun City, AZ 85351
(623) 832-4000
 
 
 
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