Cancer Screenings & Diagnostics

Tools & Information for Better Cancer Care

The best cure for cancer is prevention. Unfortunately, some cancer risk is simply beyond your control. In those cases, early detection is the next best thing to prevention.

At Banner Health, our main goal is to prevent cancer when we can, and detect it as early as possible when we can’t. We offer a number of cancer screenings and diagnostic procedures to protect you and your family.

How Do I Know If I Have Cancer?

The path to treat and beat cancer begins with an accurate diagnosis. We use our diagnostic technologies to clearly and accurately identify cancer and its stage (where it is in the body and if it is spreading.)

Some of our diagnostic tools include:

  • Biopsy
  • CT scan
  • Ductogram
  • Mammogram
  • MRI
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • PET scan (Positron Emission Tomography)
  • Ultrasound (high-frequency sound waves used to locate a tumor)

Should I Get a Second Opinion?

When you face a cancer diagnosis, you need information so you can make informed decisions. If your cancer was diagnosed somewhere else, we invite you to see us for a second opinion. It might help you feel more confident in your treatment choices, and the cost is usually covered by insurance.

What Cancer Screenings Do I Need?

Doctors use certain screenings to detect cancer and other potential health problems early before they get worse.

Breast Health

Breast Cancer Screenings

We use the latest technology to diagnose breast cancer and other breast health conditions. Our screenings include:

  • Breast MRI
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Clinical breast exam
  • Mammogram

Talk to your doctor about what screenings are right for you.

Recommended Screening Schedule

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends women ages 50 to 74 have a mammogram every 2 years.

Your doctor may recommend different screening guidelines depending on your personal risk factors. Women at high risk of breast cancer may get a breast MRI each year in addition to a mammogram.

Colon Health

Colon and Rectal Cancer Screenings

We offer all standard colon and rectal cancer screenings, including:

  • Colonoscopy
  • Sigmoidoscopy
  • Double contrast barium enema
  • CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy)
  • Fecal occult blood test (FDBT)
  • Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)
  • Stool DNA tests (look for certain abnormal sections of DNA from cancer or polyps in your stool)

Talk to your doctor about what screenings are right for you.

Recommended Screening Schedule

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that, beginning at age 50 through age 75, men and women should have:

  • Fecal occult blood testing every year
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years
  • Colonoscopy every 10 years

Your doctor may recommend different screening guidelines depending on your personal risk factors.

Lung Health

If you smoke, or if you smoked in the past, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of a lung cancer screening.

Low Dose CT Lung Screening

The low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is available as a lung cancer screening for adults ages 55 to 77 years who meet the following requirements:

  • Don’t have signs or symptoms of lung cancer
  • Are a current smoker or have quit smoking in the last 15 years
  • Have a tobacco smoking history of at least 30 “pack years” (an average of one pack a day for 30 years)
  • Have a written order from their physician or qualified non-physician practitioner

Lung Cancer Screenings

If you and your doctor decide a lung cancer screening is right for you, you may have several options:

  • Chest X-rays
  • Spiral CT scans
  • Sputum cytology test

Talk to your doctor about what screenings are right for you.

Prostate Health

Prostate Cancer Screenings

Common prostate cancer screenings include:

  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test
  • Digital rectal exam (DRE)

Talk to your doctor to find out if and what screenings are right for you. The USPSTF currently recommends against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for prostate cancer.

Your doctor may recommend different screening guidelines depending on your personal risk factors.

Skin Health

Regularly checking your skin and getting routine skin exams from your doctor may be the best ways to catch skin cancer in its earliest stages. Learn more about how to identify skin cancer with information from our health library.

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