Education & Support

Frequently Asked Questions

Whether it’s a scorpion sting, medication question, first aid advice or potential poisoning, the Banner Poison & Drug Information Center in Phoenix, Arizona is available 24/7. Below are some of our most frequently asked questions. 

Every year over 8,000 people in Arizona who were stung by a scorpion called a poison center.  Over 90% of these people were managed safely at home without needing to go to an emergency room.

Pain at the site and a feeling of numbness and tingling spreading around the body is expected, although an unusual and frightening feeling; this is the reaction of the scorpion venom on the nerves in the body. There is no need to panic. The sensations will typically start getting better in a few hours.

Scorpion stings can cause serious effects, especially in young children, so call the Poison Center right away.

There are a lot of myths and stories about scorpions and how to treat symptoms. For advice on treatment and what other effects you can see, please call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222

To identify a pill, please call 1-800-222-1222 and press 4 when prompted. In order to allow us to assist you faster, please have the color and shape of the pill and inscription on the pill ready to help speed up the identification process.

Depending on the medication, the side effects you are having could be common with use or could be an adverse reaction.

Call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222 to speak with a Registered Nurse about your medication and the side effects you may be experiencing.

Call the Poison Center immediately at 1-800-222-1222! 

The Registered Nurse or Pharmacist on the phone will guide you through what to do for your child depending on what medication was swallowed. 

Depending on the plant it could be an emergent situation or a mild irritant. Make sure the child is not choking and all pieces of the plant are out of the mouth, have the child rinse with water and call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222 to speak with a Registered Nurse or Pharmacist. 

  • Don’t ever share medicine with someone else. A medicine is prescribed for you and only you.
  • Read the label and follow your doctor’s or pharmacists’ instructions.
  • Always lock up your medicine, including painkillers. That way, young children will not get into the medicine and it will be harder for teens or others to take something they should not.
  • Keep track of how many pills are in each bottle so you will know if some are missing.
  • Discard all unused medicines as soon as you finish taking them. Call your poison center at 1-800-222-1222 about how to dispose of medicine safely.
  • Participate in local medication disposal events. It is the safest way to remove prescription drugs from homes and protect the environment at the same time. 

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