About Clinical Trials

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While you may think of research as only involving scientists in a lab, our clinical trials allow you to participate in the latest medical innovations, bridging the gap between research and health care. Clinical trials at Banner Research safely evaluate new treatments, including drugs, medical devices, vaccines, blood products and gene therapies, on volunteer patients before making the treatment available for clinical use. This benefits the patients, physicians and the broader research community.

Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to access new medicine-based treatments that can increase your chances for improved health. As a respected member of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP), Banner Research is renowned for its high-quality patient care, protection for its participants, commitment to diversity and ethically sound research.

Clinical trial participation from patients like you in clinical trials will continue to lead to new and better treatments for diseases. Banner Research is dedicated to conducting research ethically, carefully and efficiently, while prioritizing patient safety throughout the clinical trial process. Learn more about what to expect during a clinical trial.

Learn about clinical trials available at these locations:

What is a Clinical Trial?

Clinical trials are a critical part of finding new and improved ways to detect, treat and prevent illnesses. A clinical trial is a type of research study that uses human volunteers, also known as participants, to test and evaluate a new treatment’s effectiveness and answer specific questions about the treatment.

Are Clinical Trials Safe?

Patient safety is the highest priority and there are multiple layers of review and approval embedded in the clinical trial process in order to keep patients safe. Before a clinical trial begins, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires years of safety testing on the new treatment conducted by pharmaceutical researchers. All clinical trials must also be approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), a special committee made up of scientists, doctors and lay people. The Institutional Review Board reviews the study’s design and the trial’s progress to ensure that patients are not exposed to unnecessary risks.

What is an FDA-Approved Clinical Trial?

An FDA-approved clinical trial is one that has been carefully reviewed by the FDA and has met strict federal guidelines. The FDA ensures the treatments are safe and effective for people to use. Once a clinical trial is FDA-approved, the treatment is permitted to be tested in humans.

How Is FDA Approval Obtained?

Prior to obtaining FDA approval for a clinical trial, a treatment’s safety and efficacy must be verified through pre-clinical research. Once the researchers can confirm that the treatment won’t pose unreasonable and significant risk to humans, the treatment must begin the Investigational New Drug (IND) process and submit an application to the FDA for approval to begin clinical research. The FDA review team will have 30 days to review the Investigational New Drug application to determine if the clinical trial meets federal standards. In most cases, the FDA is satisfied that the clinical trial meets those standards and is permitted to proceed with the clinical research. Decisions involving clinical holds or delays are rare; in most cases, the FDA provides feedback that are intended to improve the quality of the clinical trial.

Our Commitment to Diversity

At Banner Research, we strive to ensure our clinical trials include diverse populations and reflect different ages, races, ethnicities and genders, especially for those most affected by illnesses. We are committed to providing accessible research opportunities for underrepresented populations and communities.

Through ongoing research initiatives and the longstanding support of our partners, Banner Research is able to provide patients with unmatched quality care with the most advanced treatments and diagnosis. Sign up to join a clinical trial today {1.2.3 Join a Clinical Trial}.